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Gram’s Cookbook – Page 29 Pies

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Pie.   The perfect country food.  Homemade crust, fruit filling… yum.  Growing up, we had sour cherry trees over at my Grandmother’s house and us grandkids were conscripted to help pick ALL of the cherries every summer.  There were at least 5 trees.  The only good thing about it all (other than all of the pie that we got to eat later) were the ice cream bars that were in my grandparent’s basement freezer.   Later, we got to pit all of those cherries and then help my mom can them.  I didn’t realize that sour cherries didn’t live everywhere or appreciate how wonderful they really are… and now in Texas, narry a sour cherry tree is found here.

But, fruit pies are not what we’re here to talk about this week.  Nope, this week is about other types of pies…

Chocolate Pie

Eight tablespoons grated chocolate

Four cups of milk

Yolks of four eggs

Two cups of sugar

Four tablespoons of cornstarch or flour

Cook until thick – this will make four pies.

Agnes Noone

Butterscotch Pie

1 cup brown sugar

2 level tablespoons butter

2 rounding tablespoons flour

2 egg yolks

1 1/2 cup milk

Mix and cool well together, stirring.

Mrs. J.W. Newburry

Pumpkin Pie

1 qt pumpkin

3 cups of milk

1 1/2 cups sugar

ginger & cinnamon

a little sorgum

 This makes 3 pies.

From Mrs. Geo. Melvin Harper Ks. 

So, for me, the cream pies… are not really my thing.  All that milk and… but pumpkin pie?

Peggy Greb - USDA via Wikipedia

Part of my families holiday tradition.  Of course it is – it’s nearly on everyone’s table.   Except for the milk issue… which of course, I try to limit.  There are many pumpkin pie recipes out there that use tofu, but I’ve never been able to get my mind around tofu unless someone else cooks it.  Then, I found this recipe.  I haven’t tried it yet, but it uses almond milk and looks like pie!   So, there is hope for me yet.

Now, as far as pie goes… This is truly an old fashioned dish.  Like ancient.  Lots of good information on the wikipedia site but the gist of it is – it is thousands of years old.  Originally used as a method of transporting food for trips on ships or on long trips on land.  Remember – no refrigeration  and no fancy preservatives.  Think Cornish pastry – meat and veggies inside of a pastry pocket.

The wikipedia site also stated that pies were preferred cooking method because they could be made on an open fire with no need for an oven.  I’ve never seen a pie cooked over an open fire but… pies do seem more common in rural areas.

But, pies are not all old fashioned.  In fact, there is an American Pie Council.  Did you know that?  Another good place for recipes of all things pie!

So, that’s it for pie.  Next week, a very unusual pudding that I’ve never heard of before.  Anyone want to volunteer to make it and send me a picture/review?  Still too much milk for me… but I’d love for someone to give it a try!  If you’re interested, please let me know!

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6 responses »

  1. I haven’t had butterscotch pie for so long. It is so yummy!

    Reply
  2. I’m game for trying the pudding! Game game game! ESPECIALLY if it’s unusual!

    The other day at work (I work in a kitchen, feeding the masses), I made a Tomato pie. And now I’m obsessed. SO GOOD! But then again. I love pie! And I love the measuring of chocolate by volume after it’s been grated. I’ve never seen that before.

    Reply
    • I know – you never see volume measurements for chocolate – so much depends on how finely you grate it! I think that is where the “art” of cooking comes in… and why I have a pretty digital scale in my kitchen now!

      Reply
  3. I was just talking to my mom about pumpkin today… she said “you’ve not tasted pumpkin pie until you make it with real pumpkin – not from the can”… I don’t remember having “real” pumpkin pie but my mom swears I have… shrug… I may try it this year…

    As for your pudding.. I’ll give it a try!

    Reply
  4. Thanks ladies! Recipes have been sent to you both. I can’t wait to see what you come up with next week!

    Reply

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